Somalia Country Fact Sheet

SOMALIA HAD ENDURED YEARS OF CIVIL WAR, LEAVING THE ENVIRONMENT SEVERELY DAMAGED DUE TO POOR PRACTICES SUCH AS DESTRUCTION OF VEGETATION FOR CHARCOAL BURNING AND FIREWOOD, INSECURITY AND AN UNSTABLE GOVERNMENT, WHICH SAW BASIC SOCIAL SERVICES TO SOMALIS ABANDONED.

We set out to empower people with leadership skills, to provided education to the youth, and to bring communities together to discuss peace and democracy. From a small local organization two decade ago, we have become one of the key players on the East African regional humanitarian and development stage. 

From leadership and peace building, we have expanded our areas of focus to cash transfers, environmental restoration, as well as agriculture, emergency response, Water Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH), education and the participation of women in politics. All of these activities are geared towards building communities’ resilience and changing the way people think about, and deliver, aid in Africa.

Beneficiaries:

  • Local food insecure communities
  • Pastoralist communities
  • Internally displaced persons

Focus:

  • Short and long-term needs of communities
  • Building community resilience to future shocks

Types of assistance:

  • Emergency cash relief,
  • Cash for work projects,
  • Community training
  • Livelihood diversification to address food security
  • Natural resources management

 

2015 Quick Facts

  • 126,270 people empowered through unconditional cash transfers, allowing them to meet their basic needs. About 66% of these individuals are women with low incomes. 
  • 35,512 people acquired skills for life and a living wage from our Cash for Work schemes. Many of these activities focused on rehabilitation of the environment.
  •  21,420 people accessed tools and seeds to increase their land’s yield and feed their families.
  •  109,719 people gained access to safe drinking water and sanitation services.
  • 16,783 people benefited from livelihood cash grants to improve their income generating activities and sustain them on their way to self-sufficiency.
  • 176,800 people were mobilized to contribute to restoration of the natural environment.
  • 74,284 people benefited from a borehole drilled in Deg Elema, Lower Juba , Somalia. Previously, residents could walk up to 14km to the nearest water point to buy water, an expense families often could not afford. 

Current Projects